For the sake of it: Perfection Unnecessary

Arts

I feel like I’m ok at drawing, not fantastic, but ok. If I put my mind to drawing something it usually looks somewhat like what I’m trying to draw. There’s definitely room for improvement though and creative exercises are one way to flex your creativity and push through your own boundaries.

Continuous line drawings are where you draw your subject without taking your pencil off the paper. No re-dos, no erasing anything because it doesn’t look right, no starting over.

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It’s intimidating at first, the drawings aren’t turning out quite how you imagine them. Then something happens, you stop worrying about your drawings looking perfect and you start trying to figure out how to move the pencil in ways that will allow you to create different shapes, shading and contours. Inspired anti-perfectionism.

-Steph

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For the sake of it: preliminary drawings

Arts, Projects

Making art for the sake of it might mean different things to some than others. To me, it means working on all the projects I never had the time/energy/courage for.

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It means ignoring the self-doubt that says “this is crap, no one will like what you’re doing”. It isn’t about what other people like.

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It means accepting that the real art is in the creative process, and the final outcome, the body of work, is only the last representation of that artistic expression.

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It means submission to our own creative powers, whatever they are, for the sake of it.

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From the Sketchbook: More watercolours, more mandala

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Inspired by space and love

Inspired by space and love

More colour mixing practise; I’m trying to get as many different tones out of the paints as possible, but the pigment is sensitive, and often leads me into accidentally creating a colour that is already on the palette! Blending is the next technique I plan to experiment with.

I intended to sharpen the whole thing with an ink pen, and started to in the middle. But the colours are quite harmonious together so I’m sitting on my hands with that decision…

Mandalas are fun for watercolour studies. Each time I draw a new one, it is somehow more satisfying than the one before it. Perhaps I am accessing more of myself with each mandala; maybe  I’m just getting a steadier hand and more creative control! One thing is for sure: mandalas are fun, pretty and soulful.

Happy New Year!

R.

From the Sketchbook: Weekly Scribble

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Pencil drawing in my sketchbook, finished with ink pens. I plan to do both a full-size colour and full-size black and white version; also thinking about the potential of it as a lino cut!

So many possibilities for this little doodle…

R.

From the sketchbook: For the love of mandalas

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This year, I had planned to master my drawing skills. It was my ‘thing’ (the one that sat snugly among a crowd of many other things) for 2013. It’s now September, and I’m being realistic. No, I won’t have a sketchbook filled by the end of the year with progressive sketches. But hope prevails and inspiration is everywhere, and I’m due for a time handicap from the Universe any day now…

Earlier in the year, when I still had Uni to keep me on track, I was researching stop animations and videos about drawing for an assignment, generally just waiting for The Big Idea to reveal itself to me. Somewhere along the way I came across an instructional clip on YouTube called How to grow a mandala

I was instantly drawn to the method of ‘planting a seed’ and ‘growing’ an illustration as unique as a snowflake. It’s the kind of art practice you can get drawn into (…ahem, sorry), engaging in instantaneous creative practice with a degree of focus that borderlines a meditative state. Getting lost in the creative moment can quickly and quietly become Art Therapy, as the mind puts down the inner monologue and gets caught up in the free-flow of artistic practise, but it can be so hard to achieve that level of focus if you have anxiety, creative block, a time-consuming lifestyle, etc. I now approach mandala drawing (and variations of it) as a shortcut to “the zone”; that place in my mind where I can create freely, and without judgement.